Rabbit Ear Assisted House Wiring Antenna Trick

 

     This technique or (trick) is a new twist on an old subject.  Now, the FCC has for the most part - made all local broadcast television stations go digital, scrapping the analog system.  So in most metropolitan areas this should mean more channels and a clearer picture.  Even if you have cable or satellite TV, you may want to have a small TV that simply receives local broadcast stations... Why?  Perhaps you'll have one in your garage or shed.  Additionally, in some circumstances you cable or satellite TV provider may be down; perhaps in an emergency or some other unforeseen reason.   It has happened even with Time Warner** Cable.  And there is even some local channels at various metropolitan areas that Cable and Satellite TV doesn't bother with providing.  So here are some reason that you may still use just the good old fashioned rabbit ears...

  • So you don't have to install an outdoor antenna
  • You may be able to pick up even a few more channels
  • CCTV of your property
  • Radio:  That's right rabbit ear antennas are great for picking up local broadcast radio stations; and even from radio stations up to 200 miles away.

     Keep in mind that this trick does not always work.  In fact, there is a certain degree of luck required for it to work.  It is the principal of using your house wiring as a giant antenna.  This theory is not new.  The theory of not actually contacting any house wiring is somewhat new; and the technique of using rabbit ears below to enhance such is new. 

     The theory of using your existing house wiring as an antenna has both good and bad benefits, and is therefore based on luck.  The good benefit is that yes:  It could be a massive antenna structure.  The bad news is that it is not polarized or aimed at anything.  And all the electrical pulses could cause more interference than pick up signals.  So, using your house wiring is completely random for antenna reception.

     In the technique below, what we are trying to do is not contact any house wiring (that would be dangerous).  But rather, put the dipoles in the proximity to receive the bounced signals there from.  When you put such through your wall or ceiling, your drywall doesn't block such bounced signals as much.  This could be good, bad, or traded neutral for your broadcast reception abilities. If the technique doesn't work, you risk a little work for nothing, and the 2 drill holes in your ceiling for nothing.  But simply caulking them back with matching color caulk should hide sufficiently to the point that nobody would ever notice unless pointed out.  On the other hand, it might work very well for you and pull you in a few more channels, or perhaps get in signals clearer on certain channels.

 1. 

 aligning antenna signal bounce

  The black line in the above photo shows where your wall stud should be.  It is either to the immediate left or right and running vertically next to an electrical wall socket (if the construction crew built your home correctly). You can choose an / the socket that your TV or radio will be plugged into or any other one.  The 2 red lines in the above photo show the proximity (about 6 inches to the left and right away from your wall stud) to where you will want your antenna dipoles to pierce through the ceiling above.

2.

  drilling holes for antenna

     Give about 3 to 6 inches away from the wall and drill the 2 holes in the ceiling above where your rabbit ears will be placed, keeping in line with the 2 previously mentioned red lines in the photo from Fig. 1.

 

3.

 

holes drilled for antenna

     So your 2 holes will look something like that.

 4.

 completed antenna trick

     Now simply pierce your dipoles through the 2 holes, and experiment with different lengths of extension on your dipoles.  Also experiment with only piercing only 1 dipole through on each side...

     Again, there are no guarantees that this trick will work.  It is completely random and based on luck.

 

 

 
     

 

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